GEOL 101: Introduction to Geology

Here's a link to some tips for success in college classes

How to find Pete:
Environmental Studies Building rm. 121 (near the geology lab rooms)
Phone: 360-650-4095
email: pete@geol.wwu.edu

Welcome to the fantastic world of geology! This is where we find out how the Earth works and how our planet has developed into the awe-inspiring beast that it is.

Here are a few important documents you'll need for the class

Syllabus (in MS word) and in Adobe PDF - know these important dates!

My office hours: Tuesday/Thursday 10-noon (but stop by my office anytime, I'm usually there)

Here is the list of topics we're likely to cover over the course of the term. Notice the wide variety of topics here - geology is such a broad topic that we will only be able to explain the fundamentals of each of these aspects. My goal is to get you so jazzed about one or more of these topics that you devote your life to finding out more about it. Or, at least you'll make some smart decisions when it comes time to go on a road trip, buy a house, or vote in the next senator or president.

INTRODUCTION AND THE FORMATION OF EVERYTHING
Introduction
Formation of the Universe, Solar System, and Earth, and the structure of the Earth
Plate Tectonics - the revolution and the process

THE ROCK CYCLE
Atomic structures and minerals
The rock cycle, magma and igneous rocks
Volcanoes and volcanic hazards
Weathering and erosion
Sedimentary rocks
Metamorphic rocks
Geologic time and dating of geologic materials

THE HYDROLOGIC CYCLE
The hydrologic cycle
Streams
Coasts
Groundwater
Glaciers and ice ages
Atmosphere: weather and climate

PROCESSES ON AND IN EARTH
Mass movement
Structural geology
Earthquakes and earthquake hazards
Mountain building (orogeny)
Geologic Resources
Global change


Here are some links for student resources at Western Washington University

MyWestern
(access to all things Western, including Blackboard)
BLACKBOARD LOGIN PAGE
(this is the place to get all the class notes, assignments, and current grades for the lecture class)
Western's Tutorial and Study Center (TASC)
This is a REALLY good reference for being a better student
Western's DisAbility Resources for Students
for help with disAbling conditions
Western's Student Advising Center
Computer Labs around campus
(locations, hours, equipment, etc)
Grades
(these are grades submitted to Western's administration, not the current class grades)
Student Technology Center
UNDERSTANDING AND AVOIDING PLAGIARISM
Plagiarism will NOT be tolerated, so please review this link!
ACADEMIC DISHONESTY POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
just in case you forget to review the link above

Here is a list of links to some great resources. Give these a glance, especially if what I've presented in class isn't making sense and for some bizarre reason you can't get in touch with me for help.

LINKS FOR PRACTICAL TEACHING TIPS, ANIMATIONS AND IMAGES
Significant Figures tutorial
(Thanks Erica Martell!)
Mark Francek's animation page
(all kinds of geologic topics!)
Tanya Atwater's animation page
(mostly tectonics)
GeoTeach page of extra credit assignments
Discover Our Earth.org
(experiments and animations)
Don Berrie's site
(huge list of link organized by topic)
Norton publishers list of geology animations
Paul Howell's interactive rock cycle
(very cool!)
Alluvial Fan Lovers of North America
(who knew?)
Formation of the Colorado Nat'l Monument movie
this is really cool, but the hi-res version is >400 Mb, so beware
Nine Planets
the best solar system website out there
Digital Library for Earth System Education (DLESE)
Great resources for science education
Tsunami Video Clearinghouse
Origins of the Pacific Northwest
(from Burke Museum)